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What is sibilization?

Updated: 9/18/2023
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βˆ™ 14y ago

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Is it words with sh or sch sounds? I'm trying to find out myself. why don't yu look on the internet??

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Melvin Sipes

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βˆ™ 1y ago
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βˆ™ 12y ago

Is it words with sh or sch sounds? I'm trying to find out myself. why don't yu look on the internet??

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Q: What is sibilization?
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What is silibisation?

"Silibisation" is not a standard English term. It may be a typographical error of "sibilization," which refers to the articulation of sibilant sounds (like /s/ and /z/) in speech. If you meant something else, please provide more context.


What is Latin for mud?

I can only think of Classical maltha, V. Malta (no connection with the name of the island, which comes from Greek Melite). I remember now that the main terms fo mud in Latin are, first, lutum (also with the meaning of "clay") which finds its commonest cognate in Modern English in "pollution" and in medical English in "lues" (syphilis), and, second, limus (especially river mud) which has a cognate in Modern English slime, the initial sibilization of which is a hallmark of the affinity of English with the Slavic languages, as also attested for example in such a Russian word as sletat, sletet, "to fly", but also "to fall", as from stairs or a horse. (See for example my blog, http://thegnosticedda.blogspot.com, on the early semantic convergence of gliding, flying and falling). It can be broadly argued that terms for "impurity" in IE languages have a psychological element of the apotropaic as a personable afferent and therefore are applied liberally to anything (physical) considered "unclean" without regard as to its nature. Therefore one can possibly include ME "lime" and "loam" in that category as a cognate, i.e. both a linguistic and a psychological one. However, a word of caution is in place here, as a continual preoccupation along these lines incurs a serious risk of disintegration of one's concept of language.