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55 mph. If the car stops (impact) people inside are still moving at 55 mph. They will hit the inside of the car- at 55 mph. That has the same effect as if you were standing still, and were hit by a car moving 55 mph. Messy. Wear your seatbelt.

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If a vehicle is traveling at 55 mph how fast will the unbelted occupants still be going at the moment of impact?

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