What is the origin of the phrase?

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(the gamut)
  • 1The complete range or scope of something:the whole gamut of human emotion


EXAMPLE SENTENCES
  • Anger, jealousy, possessiveness, suspicion, aggression - Harry experiences a whole gamut of human emotions, but seems to able to control them much better that he did in The Phoenix.
  • Her face could register the gamut of human emotions without ever fully revealing her inner nature.
  • These stories take you on an exciting journey, and you traverse a whole gamut of human experience and emotions that reflect the changing Tamil milieu.

What is the origin of the phrase talking trash?

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The expression was originally "God be with Ye (or you)", as a sort of blessing or good luck phrase to someone leaving your presence and was later shortened to 'good bye'.

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It is from the cloth industry, where a small flaw was seen in the manufacturing process of fabric, a string was inserted so the flaw could be easily identified. If 'no strings

What is the origin of the phrase 'plumb full?

As an informal word meaning "utterly" plumb may derive from its formal meaning of "exactly vertical." But the variant spelling "plum" suggests that its origin may lie elsewh